ARV stockouts putting lives at risk, says SSP

By Anso Thom and Marcus Low

LATEST NEWS! Updated circular on Lamivudine can be seen here

Stockouts of several critical medicines have been reported at healthcare facilities in five provinces, according to a statement from the Stop Stockouts Project (SSP). This includes stockouts of the antiretroviral (ARV) combination of Abacavir and Lamivudine and of various oral and injectable contraceptives. The Abacavir and Lamivudine combination is prescribed in the public sector to tens of thousands of patients who have become resistant to first line ARVs.

Following up on initial reports from users of the public healthcare system, Treatment Action Campaign (TAC) members are currently visiting healthcare facilities in the Free State and Gauteng to assess the situation. They are reporting stockouts of ARVs, paracetamol, flu medication, contraceptives, some antibiotics and HIV test kits. The TAC, together with various other civil society organisations, is a member of the SSP.

National Department of Health Director-General Precious Matsoso said they had sent technical teams to work with the TAC in an effort to identify affected facilities and patients. She said a circular was being prepared and will be sent to doctors with guidance on how to switch patients to alternative drugs.

The SSP says that several stockouts have been unresolved since the second half of 2018 and “the situation has now escalated into a crisis”.

They warned that scores of lives are at risk.

SSP’s Kopano Klaas said they had received stockout reports of second-line ARVs from the Free State, Gauteng, Mpumalanga, Limpopo and KwaZulu-Natal.

A list of stockouts supplied by the Treatment Action Campaign in the Free State reveals that since March there has been stockouts of the Abacavir/Lamivudine combination in at least 15 health facilities.

In the Mangaung Metro district it includes Mafane, Thaba-Nchu, Freedom Square, Bloemspruit and Gabriel Dichabe.

In the Lejweleputswa district the TAC reported stockouts at Rheederspark, Bophelong, Tshepong, Welkom, Leratong, Phomolong, Boithusong and Welkom.

In the Thabo Mofutsanyane districts stockouts were reported at Intabzwe and Qholaqhwe. The stockouts at Qholaghwe were understood to be mainly due to a break-in at the clinic.

Information from a TAC visit to Gabriel Dichabe Clinic in Bloemfontein suggests that there has been a breakdown between the provincial depot, the pharmacy, the clinic and patients. In cases where the clinic does not have stock, patients are given scripts so that they can purchase medicines at private pharmacies. The Medicines Price Registry lists a price of R921 for a month’s supply of the Abacavir and Lamivudine combination – likely out of reach for most public sector patients.

SSP also said that there had been repeated stockouts of injectables and oral contraceptives. Klaas said according to their information only one company was contracted to supply the oral contraceptive and because they were given very short notice they have been unable to keep up with the demand. Klaas also claimed that alternative companies were not interested in supplying the contraceptives as they were paid late or not at all.

The only alternative, an implantable device, is ineffective in women on ARV regimens containing Efavirenz, contained in most first line combinations provided in the public healthcare system.

“The SSP reports in to District, Provincial and National Departments of Health staff on a daily basis, but they seem to know as much or as little as we do. Surely someone needs to account to the scores of patients, who are travelling long distances to collect their medication, having to take a day off work to do so, only to be turned away when they get there?” Klaas said.

Deputy Director General in the NDOH Dr Anban Pillay said that there was a shortage of  Lamivudine globally and that the pharmaceutical company Mylan was unable to supply full order quantities.

He said they had secured a section 21 approval so that they can get stock from another source. Pillay advised facilities to manage the shortage by providing lesser quantities than usual for each patient.

On the contraceptives, Pillay said there should be no stockout but a shortage of the injectable nuristerate. “This is due to the only supplier Bayer being unable to produce sufficient quantities relative to demand. SA is one of a few countries using nuristerate,” he said.

Note: Spotlight is published by SECTION27 and the TAC – both of which are members of the SSP. Spotlight is editorially independent and a member of the Press Council.

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